Regína sacratíssimi Rosárii, ora pro nobis!

Occurring Scripture for the Hour of Matins

Our Lady of the Rosary

Sundays after PentecostAugust thru November

On Sundays
the first three (or six) lessons at Matins are taken from the occurring Scripture for the appropriate week of the months of August thru November.
The remaining lessons are given below, as assigned to the current week after Pentecost

Seventh Sunday after Pentecost

Eighth Sunday after Pentecost

Ninth Sunday after Pentecost

Tenth Sunday after Pentecost

Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost

Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost

Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost

Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost

Twenty-First Sunday after Pentecost

Twenty-Second Sunday after Pentecost

Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost

There may be as many as Twenty-Eight Sundays after Pentecost
please see the rubric at
..\english\pentend.html to see how the number is determined,
and from where the texts are to be taken.

Third Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Fourth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Fifth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Sixth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Twenty-Fourth and Last Sunday after Pentecost

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seventh Sunday after Pentecost
 

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Matthew
Matthew 7:15-21


    At that time, Jesus said unto His disciples:  "Beware of false prophets, who come to you in the clothing of sheep, but inwardly they are ravening wolves.  By their fruits you shall know them. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?  Even so every good tree brings forth good fruit, and the evil tree brings forth evil fruit.  A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can an evil tree bring forth good fruit.  Every tree that brings not forth good fruit, shall be cut down, and shall be cast into the fire.  Wherefore by their fruits you shall know them.  Not every one that says to Me, 'Lord, Lord,' shall enter into the kingdom of heaven: but he that does the will of My Father who is in heaven shall enter into the kingdom of heaven.

An Homily of Saint Hilary, Bishop
Commentary on Matthew (Chapter VI)

    The Lord here warns us that we must rate the worth of soft words and seeming meekness, by the fruits which they that manifest such good things in their worksand that we should look, in order to see what a man is, not at what he professes, but at his deeds. For there are many in whom sheep's clothing is but a mask to hide wolfish ravening. But "Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles Even so every good tree brings forth good fruit, but a corrupt tree brings forth evil fruit." Thus, the Lord teaches us, it is with men alsoevil men bring not forth good fruits, and thereby we may know them. Lip-service alone does not win the kingdom of heaven, nor is every one who says unto Christ, "Lord, Lord," an heir of that kingdom.

Lesson viii

    What use is there in calling the Lord, "Lord"? Would He not be Lord all the same, whether or not we called Him?  So what holiness is there in this ascription of a name, when the true way to enter into the kingdom of heaven is to do the will of "Our Father, Who is in heaven"?  Many will say to Me in that day "Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy Name " Already here does the Lord rebuke the deceit of the false prophets, and the feigning of the hypocrites, who take glory to themselves because of the power of their words, their prophesying in teaching, their casting out of devils, and such mighty works.

Lesson ix

    Because of all these things they promised themselves that they shall enter into the kingdom of heavenas though in their words and works any good things were their ownand not all the mighty working of that God upon Whom they call, since reading brings knowledge of doctrine, and the Name of Christ drives out devils. That which is needed on our part to win that blessed eternity, that of our own which we must give, is to will to do right, to turn away from all evil, to obey with our whole heart the commandments laid on us from heaven, and so to become the friends of God. It should be ours rather to do God's will, than to boast of God's power. And we must put away from us and thrust away those who are by their wicked works already estranged from His friendship.

Let us pray:
O God, whose providence in the ordering of all things never fails; we humbly beseech Thee to put away from us all harmful things, and to give us those things which are profitable for us. Through our Lord.

 

Eighth Sunday after Pentecost


The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke
Luke 16:1-9

    At that time, Jesus spoke this parable to His disciples: "There was a certain rich man who had a steward: and the same was accused to him, that he had wasted his goods.  And he called him, and said to him: 'How is it that I hear this of thee? give an account of your stewardship: for now you can be steward no longer.'  And the steward said within himself: 'What shall I do, because my lord take away from me the stewardship? To dig I am not able; to beg I am ashamed....   I know what I will do, that when I shall be removed from the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.'  Therefore calling together every one of his lord's debtors, he said to the first: 'How much do you owe my lord?' But he said: 'An hundred barrels of oil.' And he said to him: 'Take your bill and sit down quickly, and write fifty.'  Then he said to another: 'And how much do you owe?'  Who said: 'An hundred quarters of wheat.' He said to him: 'Take your bill, and write eighty.'  And the lord commended the unjust steward, forasmuch as he had done wisely: for the children of this world are wiser in their generation than the children of light.  And I say to you: Make friends of the mammon of iniquity; that when you shall fail, they may receive you into everlasting dwellings."

An Homily of Saint Jerome, Priest
Letter 151, to Algasia.

    The lord commended the unjust steward, because he had done wisely though wickedly. The lord, although himself defrauded by it, could not but praise the shrewdness of his dishonest servant, because he had cheated him with profit to himself. How much more will our Master Christ, Who is above any defrauding by us, and is Himself the Great Forgiver, praise us if we win a blessing from Him by dealing indulgently with those who are to believe in Him?

Lesson viii

    After this parable the Lord said: "Make to yourselves friends of the mammon of unrighteousness." This word "mammon" is a Syriac (not an Hebrew) word, signifying ill-gotten gains. If then even ill-gotten gains can be so used by such as have them as to profit them, how much more can they who, like the Apostles, are " stewards of the mysteries of God," those true and blameless riches, how much more can they profit themselves, even everlastingly, by their right use of them?

Lesson ix

    Therefore it is immediately written: "He that is faithful in that which is leastthat is to say, in bodily thingsis faithful also in much that is to say, in spiritual things. "And he that is unjust in the least" that is to say, by not giving to his needy brother succor of those things which are needful for the body, and which God has made for all men, such an one is unjust also in muchthat is to say, he will deal out spiritual things unfairly, this to one and that to another, and not according to their true spiritual needs. "If therefore," said the Lord, "you have not been faithful in the" use of earthly riches which pass away, "who will commit to your trust the true and abiding riches," that is, the spiritual riches of the word of God?''

Let us pray:
    Grant to us, O Lord, we beseech Thee, the spirit to think and do always such things as are right; that we who cannot exist without Thee may be able to live according to Thy will.

Ninth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii


The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke
Luke 19: 41-47

    At that time, when Jesus drew near Jerusalem, seeing the city, He wept over it, saying: "If you  had known, and that in this your day, the things that are to your peace: but now they are hidden from your eyes. For the days shall come upon you, and your enemies shall cast a trench about you, and encompass you, and straiten you on every side, and beat you flat to the ground, and your children who are in you: and they shall not leave in you a stone upon a stone, because you did not known the time of your visitation." And entering into the temple, he began to cast out the sellers therein, and those who bought, saying to them: "It is written, 'My house is the house of, prayer' (Isaias 56:7),  but you have made it a den of thieves." And he was teaching daily in the temple.

An Homily of Pope Saint Gregory the Great
XXXIX on the Gospels.

    No man that has read the history of the destruction of Jerusalem by the Roman Princes Vespasian and Titus, can be ignorant that it was of that destruction that the Lord spoke when He wept over the ruin of the city. It is these Princes that are pointed at where it is said "For the days shall come upon you that your enemies shall cast a trench about you." The truth of what follows: "They shall not leave in you one stone upon another" is even now fulfilled in the change of site of the city, which hath been re-built round about that place outside the gates, where the Lord was crucified, while the ancient city hath been, as I am told, rooted up from the very foundations.

Lesson viii

    What the sin of Jerusalem was which brought upon her the punishment of this destruction, we find written after "Because you knew not the time of your visitation." The Maker of men, through the mystery of His Incarnation, was pleased to visit her, but she remembered not to fear and to love Him. Hence also the Prophet Jeremias, rebuking the hardness of man's heart, called the birds of the air to testify against it, saying "The stork in the heaven knows her appointed time and the turtle, and the swallow, and the crane, observe the time of their coming but my people know not the judgment of the Lord" (Jeremias 8:7).

Lesson ix

    The Savior wept over the ruin of the unfaithful city, while she herself did not yet knew that it was coming. "If you had known," said He, even youand we may understand Him to have meant—"you would have wept, in place of making merry as you now do, not knowing what hangs over you." And hence He said farther: "at least in this day, the things which belong to your peace." While she was giving herself up to fleshly pleasures, and casting no look ahead upon coming sorrows, she had still for a day in her power the things which might have brought her peace.

Let us pray:
    O Lord, let thy merciful ears be open to the prayers of thy humble servants; and, that they may obtain their petitions, make them to ask such things as shall please thee. Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Tenth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke
Luke 18:9-14

    At that time: Jesus spoke this parable unto certain men who trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others:  "Two men went up into the temple to pray: the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican.  The Pharisee standing, prayed thus with himself: 'O God, I give thee thanks that I am not as the rest of men, extortionists, unjust, adulterers, as also is this publican.  I fast twice in a week: I give tithes of all that I possess.'  And the publican, standing afar off, would not so much as lift up his eyes towards heaven; but struck his breast, saying: 'O God, be merciful to me a sinner.'  I say to you, this man went down into his house justified rather than the other: because every one that exalts himself, shall be humbled: and he that humbles himself, shall be exalted.

 

An Homily of Saint Augustine, Bishop
Sermon  XXXVI on the Word of the Lord

    The Pharisee might at least have said, "I am not as many men are." But what means "other men"? All other men except himself. "I,"  he said, "am righteous; others are sinners." "I am not as other men are, extortionists, unjust, adulterers," and then he took occasion, from the nearness of the publican, to plume himself "or even," said he, "as this publican." "I am alone," he thought, "that publican" is one of the others. My righteousness makes the gulf between me and the wicked, such as he is.

Lesson viii

    " I fast twice in the week; I give tithes of all that I possess."  If we look in his prayer to find what he went to the Temple to pray to God for, we shall find nothing.  He went up to pray, but his prayer was not a request of anything from God, but a glorification of himself. It was little enough not to pray to God, but he also glorified himself and despised his neighbor. But the publican stood afar off and yet drew nigh to God. Self-knowledge bade him keep at a distance, but his earnestness made him close. The publican stood afar off, but the Lord was at hand to hear him.

Lesson ix

    "Though the Lord be high, yet He has respect unto the lowly" but the proud, such as was this Pharisee, "He knows afar off" (Psalm 137:6).  He knows the proud, all the same, but they are far off from Him. Consider now the lowliness of the publican. It was not only that he stood afar off, but "he would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven."  He looked carefully, lest he should look up, he dared not to lift up his eyes unto heaven. Self-knowledge kept him down, though hope raised him up. Consider again, how that he "struck his breast." He afflicted himself, and therefore the Lord had compassion upon his acknowledgment of guilt." He struck his breast, saying 'Lord, be merciful to me a sinner.'"  Hearken here to a prayer and wonder that when the sinner remembers, God forgets.

Let us pray:

    O God, who dost manifest Thy power chiefly in showing mercy and pity: increase Thy mercy towards us, that we, seeking the way of Thy promises, may be made partakers of Thy heavenly treasures.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

 

Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Mark
Mark 7:31-37

 

    At that time: Jesus, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis.  And they brought to Him one deaf and dumb; and they besought Him that He would lay His hand upon him.  And taking him from the multitude apart, He put His fingers into his ears, and spitting, He touched his tongue:  And looking up to heaven, He groaned, and said to him: "Ephpheta," which is, "Be thou opened."  And immediately his ears were opened, and the string of his tongue was loosed, and he spoke right. And He charged them that they should tell no man. But the more He charged them, so much the more did they publish it.  And so much the more did they wonder, saying: "He has done all things well; He has made both the deaf to hear, and the dumb to speak."

 

An Homily of Pope Saint Gregory the Great
Homily x Book i on Ezekiel.

    What does it signifyt that when God, the Maker of all, would heal a deaf and dumb man, "He put His Fingers into his ears, and He spit, and touched his tongue." What is figured by the Fingers of the Redeemer but the gifts of the Holy Ghost?  Hence it is written in another place that after He had cast out an evil spirit, He said "If I with the finger of God cast out devils, no doubt the kingdom of God is come upon you" (Luke 11:20), which words are thus given by another Evangelist: "If I cast out devils by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God is come unto you" (Matthew 12:28).  By setting these two passages together we see that the Spirit is called the Finger. For our Lord, then, to put His Fingers into the deaf man's ears was by the gift of the Holy Spirit to enlighten his dark mind unto obedience.

Lesson viii

    And what does it signify that "He spit and touched his tongue." We receive spittle out of the Redeemer's mouth upon our tongues when we receive wisdom to speak God's truth. Spittle is a secretion of the head which flows into the mouth. And so, that wisdom, which is Himself, the great Head of His Church, as soon as it hath touched our tongue,  straightway takes the form of preaching. "And looking up to heaven, He sighed," not that He had any need to sigh, Who gave whatsoever He asked, but that He was pleased to teach us to look up and sigh toward Him Whose throne is in heaven, confessing our need, that our ears should be opened by the gift of the Holy Spirit, and our tongue loosed by the spittle of our Savior's Mouth, that is, by knowledge of His Divine Word, before we can use it to preach to others.

Lesson ix

    "And He said unto him: Ephphatha, that is, be opened. And straightway his ears were opened, and the string of his tongue was loosed." Here we must remark the command, "Be opened" was addressed to the deaf ears, but the tongue also was immediately loosed. Just so, when the ears of a man's heart have been opened to learn the obedience of faith, the string of his tongue also is thereby loosed, that he may exhort others to do the good things which he does himself. It is well added "And he spoke [right]." Only he who has first learned to obey does well in preaching obedience to others.

Let us pray:
    O almighty and eternal God, who in the abundance of Thy loving kindness art wont to give beyond the deserts and desires of those who humbly pray; pour down upon us Thy mercy, forgiving those things of which our conscience is afraid, and granting us those blessings for which we dare not presume to ask.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost

Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost

Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost

Twenty-First Sunday after Pentecost

Twenty-Second Sunday after Pentecost

Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost

There may be as many as Twenty-Eight Sundays after Pentecost
please see the rubric at
..\english\pentend.html to see how the number is determined,
and from where the texts are to be taken.

Third Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Fourth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Fifth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Sixth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Twenty-Fourth and Last Sunday after Pentecost

 

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Matthew
Matthew 4:1-11

 


Dei via est íntegra
Our Lady of the Rosary, 144 North Federal Highway (US#1), Deerfield Beach, Florida 33441  954+428-2428
Authentic  Catholic Mass, Doctrine, and Moral Teaching -- Don't do without them -- 
Don't accept one without the others!