Regína sacratíssimi Rosárii, ora pro nobis!

Occurring Scripture for the Hour of Matins

Our Lady of the Rosary

Sundays after PentecostAugust thru November

On Sundays
the first three (or six) lessons at Matins are taken from the occurring Scripture for the appropriate week of the months of August thru November.
The remaining lessons are given below, as assigned to the current week after Pentecost

INDEX:

Note: This is a work in progress!
The last links on this page will be broken until the work is complete.

Seventh Sunday after Pentecost

Eighth Sunday after Pentecost

Ninth Sunday after Pentecost

Tenth Sunday after Pentecost

Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost

Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost

Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost

Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost

Twenty-First Sunday after Pentecost

Twenty-Second Sunday after Pentecost

Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost

There may be as many as Twenty-Eight Sundays after Pentecost
please see the rubric at
..\english\pentend.html to see how the number is determined,
and from where the texts are to be taken.

Third Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Fourth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Fifth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Sixth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Twenty-Fourth and Last Sunday after Pentecost

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seventh Sunday after Pentecost
 

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Matthew
Matthew 7:15-21


    At that time, Jesus said unto His disciples:  "Beware of false prophets, who come to you in the clothing of sheep, but inwardly they are ravening wolves.  By their fruits you shall know them. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?  Even so every good tree brings forth good fruit, and the evil tree brings forth evil fruit.  A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can an evil tree bring forth good fruit.  Every tree that brings not forth good fruit, shall be cut down, and shall be cast into the fire.  Wherefore by their fruits you shall know them.  Not every one that says to Me, 'Lord, Lord,' shall enter into the kingdom of heaven: but he that does the will of My Father who is in heaven shall enter into the kingdom of heaven.

An Homily of Saint Hilary, Bishop
Commentary on Matthew (Chapter VI)

    The Lord here warns us that we must rate the worth of soft words and seeming meekness, by the fruits which they that manifest such good things in their worksand that we should look, in order to see what a man is, not at what he professes, but at his deeds. For there are many in whom sheep's clothing is but a mask to hide wolfish ravening. But "Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles Even so every good tree brings forth good fruit, but a corrupt tree brings forth evil fruit." Thus, the Lord teaches us, it is with men alsoevil men bring not forth good fruits, and thereby we may know them. Lip-service alone does not win the kingdom of heaven, nor is every one who says unto Christ, "Lord, Lord," an heir of that kingdom.

Lesson viii

    What use is there in calling the Lord, "Lord"? Would He not be Lord all the same, whether or not we called Him?  So what holiness is there in this ascription of a name, when the true way to enter into the kingdom of heaven is to do the will of "Our Father, Who is in heaven"?  Many will say to Me in that day "Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy Name " Already here does the Lord rebuke the deceit of the false prophets, and the feigning of the hypocrites, who take glory to themselves because of the power of their words, their prophesying in teaching, their casting out of devils, and such mighty works.

Lesson ix

    Because of all these things they promised themselves that they shall enter into the kingdom of heavenas though in their words and works any good things were their ownand not all the mighty working of that God upon Whom they call, since reading brings knowledge of doctrine, and the Name of Christ drives out devils. That which is needed on our part to win that blessed eternity, that of our own which we must give, is to will to do right, to turn away from all evil, to obey with our whole heart the commandments laid on us from heaven, and so to become the friends of God. It should be ours rather to do God's will, than to boast of God's power. And we must put away from us and thrust away those who are by their wicked works already estranged from His friendship.

Let us pray:
O God, whose providence in the ordering of all things never fails; we humbly beseech Thee to put away from us all harmful things, and to give us those things which are profitable for us. Through our Lord.

 

Eighth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke
Luke 16:1-9

    At that time, Jesus spoke this parable to His disciples: "There was a certain rich man who had a steward: and the same was accused to him, that he had wasted his goods.  And he called him, and said to him: 'How is it that I hear this of thee? give an account of your stewardship: for now you can be steward no longer.'  And the steward said within himself: 'What shall I do, because my lord take away from me the stewardship? To dig I am not able; to beg I am ashamed....   I know what I will do, that when I shall be removed from the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.'  Therefore calling together every one of his lord's debtors, he said to the first: 'How much do you owe my lord?' But he said: 'An hundred barrels of oil.' And he said to him: 'Take your bill and sit down quickly, and write fifty.'  Then he said to another: 'And how much do you owe?'  Who said: 'An hundred quarters of wheat.' He said to him: 'Take your bill, and write eighty.'  And the lord commended the unjust steward, forasmuch as he had done wisely: for the children of this world are wiser in their generation than the children of light.  And I say to you: Make friends of the mammon of iniquity; that when you shall fail, they may receive you into everlasting dwellings."

An Homily of Saint Jerome, Priest
Letter 151, to Algasia.

    The lord commended the unjust steward, because he had done wisely though wickedly. The lord, although himself defrauded by it, could not but praise the shrewdness of his dishonest servant, because he had cheated him with profit to himself. How much more will our Master Christ, Who is above any defrauding by us, and is Himself the Great Forgiver, praise us if we win a blessing from Him by dealing indulgently with those who are to believe in Him?

Lesson viii

    After this parable the Lord said: "Make to yourselves friends of the mammon of unrighteousness." This word "mammon" is a Syriac (not an Hebrew) word, signifying ill-gotten gains. If then even ill-gotten gains can be so used by such as have them as to profit them, how much more can they who, like the Apostles, are " stewards of the mysteries of God," those true and blameless riches, how much more can they profit themselves, even everlastingly, by their right use of them?

Lesson ix

    Therefore it is immediately written: "He that is faithful in that which is leastthat is to say, in bodily thingsis faithful also in much that is to say, in spiritual things. "And he that is unjust in the least" that is to say, by not giving to his needy brother succor of those things which are needful for the body, and which God has made for all men, such an one is unjust also in muchthat is to say, he will deal out spiritual things unfairly, this to one and that to another, and not according to their true spiritual needs. "If therefore," said the Lord, "you have not been faithful in the" use of earthly riches which pass away, "who will commit to your trust the true and abiding riches," that is, the spiritual riches of the word of God?''

Let us pray:
    Grant to us, O Lord, we beseech Thee, the spirit to think and do always such things as are right; that we who cannot exist without Thee may be able to live according to Thy will.

Ninth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii


The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke
Luke 19: 41-47

    At that time, when Jesus drew near Jerusalem, seeing the city, He wept over it, saying: "If you  had known, and that in this your day, the things that are to your peace: but now they are hidden from your eyes. For the days shall come upon you, and your enemies shall cast a trench about you, and encompass you, and straiten you on every side, and beat you flat to the ground, and your children who are in you: and they shall not leave in you a stone upon a stone, because you did not known the time of your visitation." And entering into the temple, he began to cast out the sellers therein, and those who bought, saying to them: "It is written, 'My house is the house of, prayer' (Isaias 56:7),  but you have made it a den of thieves." And he was teaching daily in the temple.

An Homily of Pope Saint Gregory the Great
XXXIX on the Gospels.

    No man that has read the history of the destruction of Jerusalem by the Roman Princes Vespasian and Titus, can be ignorant that it was of that destruction that the Lord spoke when He wept over the ruin of the city. It is these Princes that are pointed at where it is said "For the days shall come upon you that your enemies shall cast a trench about you." The truth of what follows: "They shall not leave in you one stone upon another" is even now fulfilled in the change of site of the city, which hath been re-built round about that place outside the gates, where the Lord was crucified, while the ancient city hath been, as I am told, rooted up from the very foundations.

Lesson viii

    What the sin of Jerusalem was which brought upon her the punishment of this destruction, we find written after "Because you knew not the time of your visitation." The Maker of men, through the mystery of His Incarnation, was pleased to visit her, but she remembered not to fear and to love Him. Hence also the Prophet Jeremias, rebuking the hardness of man's heart, called the birds of the air to testify against it, saying "The stork in the heaven knows her appointed time and the turtle, and the swallow, and the crane, observe the time of their coming but my people know not the judgment of the Lord" (Jeremias 8:7).

Lesson ix

    The Savior wept over the ruin of the unfaithful city, while she herself did not yet knew that it was coming. "If you had known," said He, even youand we may understand Him to have meant—"you would have wept, in place of making merry as you now do, not knowing what hangs over you." And hence He said farther: "at least in this day, the things which belong to your peace." While she was giving herself up to fleshly pleasures, and casting no look ahead upon coming sorrows, she had still for a day in her power the things which might have brought her peace.

Let us pray:
    O Lord, let thy merciful ears be open to the prayers of thy humble servants; and, that they may obtain their petitions, make them to ask such things as shall please thee. Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Tenth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke
Luke 18:9-14

    At that time: Jesus spoke this parable unto certain men who trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others:  "Two men went up into the temple to pray: the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican.  The Pharisee standing, prayed thus with himself: 'O God, I give thee thanks that I am not as the rest of men, extortionists, unjust, adulterers, as also is this publican.  I fast twice in a week: I give tithes of all that I possess.'  And the publican, standing afar off, would not so much as lift up his eyes towards heaven; but struck his breast, saying: 'O God, be merciful to me a sinner.'  I say to you, this man went down into his house justified rather than the other: because every one that exalts himself, shall be humbled: and he that humbles himself, shall be exalted.

 

An Homily of Saint Augustine, Bishop
Sermon  XXXVI on the Word of the Lord

    The Pharisee might at least have said, "I am not as many men are." But what means "other men"? All other men except himself. "I,"  he said, "am righteous; others are sinners." "I am not as other men are, extortionists, unjust, adulterers," and then he took occasion, from the nearness of the publican, to plume himself "or even," said he, "as this publican." "I am alone," he thought, "that publican" is one of the others. My righteousness makes the gulf between me and the wicked, such as he is.

Lesson viii

    " I fast twice in the week; I give tithes of all that I possess."  If we look in his prayer to find what he went to the Temple to pray to God for, we shall find nothing.  He went up to pray, but his prayer was not a request of anything from God, but a glorification of himself. It was little enough not to pray to God, but he also glorified himself and despised his neighbor. But the publican stood afar off and yet drew nigh to God. Self-knowledge bade him keep at a distance, but his earnestness made him close. The publican stood afar off, but the Lord was at hand to hear him.

Lesson ix

    "Though the Lord be high, yet He has respect unto the lowly" but the proud, such as was this Pharisee, "He knows afar off" (Psalm 137:6).  He knows the proud, all the same, but they are far off from Him. Consider now the lowliness of the publican. It was not only that he stood afar off, but "he would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven."  He looked carefully, lest he should look up, he dared not to lift up his eyes unto heaven. Self-knowledge kept him down, though hope raised him up. Consider again, how that he "struck his breast." He afflicted himself, and therefore the Lord had compassion upon his acknowledgment of guilt." He struck his breast, saying 'Lord, be merciful to me a sinner.'"  Hearken here to a prayer and wonder that when the sinner remembers, God forgets.

Let us pray:

    O God, who dost manifest Thy power chiefly in showing mercy and pity: increase Thy mercy towards us, that we, seeking the way of Thy promises, may be made partakers of Thy heavenly treasures.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

 

Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Mark
Mark 7:31-37

 

    At that time: Jesus, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis.  And they brought to Him one deaf and dumb; and they besought Him that He would lay His hand upon him.  And taking him from the multitude apart, He put His fingers into his ears, and spitting, He touched his tongue:  And looking up to heaven, He groaned, and said to him: "Ephpheta," which is, "Be thou opened."  And immediately his ears were opened, and the string of his tongue was loosed, and he spoke right. And He charged them that they should tell no man. But the more He charged them, so much the more did they publish it.  And so much the more did they wonder, saying: "He has done all things well; He has made both the deaf to hear, and the dumb to speak."

 

An Homily of Pope Saint Gregory the Great
Homily x Book i on Ezekiel.

    What does it signifyt that when God, the Maker of all, would heal a deaf and dumb man, "He put His Fingers into his ears, and He spit, and touched his tongue." What is figured by the Fingers of the Redeemer but the gifts of the Holy Ghost?  Hence it is written in another place that after He had cast out an evil spirit, He said "If I with the finger of God cast out devils, no doubt the kingdom of God is come upon you" (Luke 11:20), which words are thus given by another Evangelist: "If I cast out devils by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God is come unto you" (Matthew 12:28).  By setting these two passages together we see that the Spirit is called the Finger. For our Lord, then, to put His Fingers into the deaf man's ears was by the gift of the Holy Spirit to enlighten his dark mind unto obedience.

Lesson viii

    And what does it signify that "He spit and touched his tongue." We receive spittle out of the Redeemer's mouth upon our tongues when we receive wisdom to speak God's truth. Spittle is a secretion of the head which flows into the mouth. And so, that wisdom, which is Himself, the great Head of His Church, as soon as it hath touched our tongue,  straightway takes the form of preaching. "And looking up to heaven, He sighed," not that He had any need to sigh, Who gave whatsoever He asked, but that He was pleased to teach us to look up and sigh toward Him Whose throne is in heaven, confessing our need, that our ears should be opened by the gift of the Holy Spirit, and our tongue loosed by the spittle of our Savior's Mouth, that is, by knowledge of His Divine Word, before we can use it to preach to others.

Lesson ix

    "And He said unto him: Ephphatha, that is, be opened. And straightway his ears were opened, and the string of his tongue was loosed." Here we must remark the command, "Be opened" was addressed to the deaf ears, but the tongue also was immediately loosed. Just so, when the ears of a man's heart have been opened to learn the obedience of faith, the string of his tongue also is thereby loosed, that he may exhort others to do the good things which he does himself. It is well added "And he spoke [right]." Only he who has first learned to obey does well in preaching obedience to others.

Let us pray:
    O almighty and eternal God, who in the abundance of Thy loving kindness art wont to give beyond the deserts and desires of those who humbly pray; pour down upon us Thy mercy, forgiving those things of which our conscience is afraid, and granting us those blessings for which we dare not presume to ask.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke
Luke 10:23-37

    At that time, Jesus said unto His disciples: "Blessed are the eyes that see the things which you see.  For I say to you, that many prophets and kings have desired to see the things that you see, and have not seen them; and to hear the things that you hear, and have not heard them." And behold a certain lawyer stood up, tempting him, and saying, "Master, what must I do to possess eternal life?"  But He said to him: "What is written in the law? how do you read it?"  He answering, said: "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with thy whole heart, and with thy whole soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind: and thy neighbor as thyself."  And He said to him: "You have answered correctly: do this, and you shall live."  But he wanting to justify himself, said to Jesus: "And who is my neighbor?"  And Jesus answering, said: "A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among robbers, who also stripped him, and having wounded him went away, leaving him half dead.  And it happened that a certain priest went down the same way: and seeing him, passed by.  In like manner also a Levite, when he was near the place and saw him, passed by.  But a certain Samaritan being on his journey, came near him; and seeing him, was moved with compassion.  And going up to him, bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine: and setting him upon his own beast, brought him to an inn, and took care of him.  And the next day he took out two denarii, and gave them to the host, and said: "Take care of him; and whatever you spend over and above this, I, at my return, will repay you. Which of these three, in your opinion, was neighbor to him that fell among the robbers?"  But he said: "He that showed mercy to him."  And Jesus said to him: Go, and do likewise.

An Homily of the Venerable Bede, Priest.
Book iii, chapter 43 on Luke x.

    Blessed were the eyes not of Scribes and Pharisees, which saw but the Body of the Lord, but those eyes, eyes blessed indeed, which were able to see those things of which it is written "Thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes" (Luke 10:21). Blessed are the eyes of those little ones unto whom it seemed good in the eyes of the Son to reveal Himself and the Father also. Abraham rejoiced to see the day of Christ and he saw it, and was glad (Cf. John  8:56). Isaias, and Micheas, and many among the Prophets, saw the glory of the Lord, therefore they are also called "Seers," but they all beheld it and hailed it at a distance, seeing but as through a glass, darkly. (Cf. I Corinthians 3:12).

Lesson viii

    Otherwise were the Apostles, who saw the Lord face to Face, eating with Him, and learning from Him by asking whatever they wanted to know. For them there was no need to be taught by Angels, or the shifting fabric of visions. They whom Luke calls "Prophets and kings," Matthew names as "Prophets and just men" (Matthew 13:17). Righteous men are indeed mighty kings, who know how to lord it over their own rebellious temptations, instead of falling under them to become their slaves.

Lesson ix

"And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted Him, saying Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?" This lawyer, who stood up to ask the Lord a tempting question touching eternal life, took the subject of his asking, as I think, from the words which the Lord had just uttered, when He said "Rejoice, because your names are written in heaven" (Luke 10:20). But his attempt was a proof of the truth of that which the Lord immediately added "I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that Thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes!" (Luke 10:21)

 

Let us pray:
    Almighty and merciful God, of whose gift it cometh that Thy faithful people do unto Thee true and laudable service; grant, we beseech Thee, that we may run without hindrance toward the attainment of Thy promises.

 

Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke
Luke 17:11-19

    It came to pass, as Jesus went to Jerusalem, that He passed through the midst of Samaria and Galilee. And, as He entered into a certain village, there met Him ten men that were lepers, who stood far off; and lifted up their voice, saying: Jesus, master, have mercy on us.  Whom when He saw, He said: "Go, show yourselves to the priests." And it came to pass, as they went, they were made clean.  And one of them, when he saw that he was made clean, went back, with a loud voice glorifying God.  And he fell on his face before His feet, giving thanks: and he was a Samaritan.  And Jesus answering, said, "Were not ten made clean? and where are the nine?  There is no one found to return and give glory to God, but this stranger."  And He said to him: "Arise, go your way; for your faith has made you whole."

 

An Homily of Saint Augustine, Bishop
Bk. ii. Gospel Questions, ch. 40.

    The ten lepers "lifted up their voices and said: 'Jesus, Master, have mercy on us.' And when He saw them, He said unto them 'Go, show yourselves to the Priests.' And it came to pass that, as they went, they were cleansed." Question why did the Lord send them to the Priests, that, as they went, they might be cleansed?  Lepers were the only class among those on whose bodies He worked mercy, whom He sent to the Priests. It is written in another place that He said to a leper whom He had cleansed: "Go, and show yourself to the Priest, and offer for your cleansing as Moses commanded, for a testimony unto them" (Luke 5:14; cf. Leviticus 14:1-57). We ask then, of what leprosy was an example, that they were rid of it were called, not "healed," but "cleansed." It is a disease which first appears in the skin, but eventually destroys the strength, and the use of feeling and of the limbs.

Lesson viii

    The lepers, therefore, we may reasonably suppose represent those who do not have the knowledge of the true faith, but rather show forth the various colored teachings of error. They hide not their ignorance, but make use of their intellect to make it manifest, and proclaim it in high-sounding phrases. There is no false doctrine that doesn't have some truth mixed up with it. A man's discourse then, with some truths in it unequally mingled with falsehoods, and all confounded in one mass, is like to the body of one that is stricken with leprosy, upon which all manner of foul colors appear in this and that place along with the true color of skin.

Lesson ix

    Such men as these are banished out of the walls of the Church, to the end that, by chance, when they stand far off they may lift up their voices and cry to Christ for pardon, just as those ten men that were lepers, which stood afar off, outside the village, lifted up their voices and said "Jesus, Master, have mercy on us." That they styled Him Master, by which title I do not know if any besought the Lord for bodily healing, I think it sufficiently shows that leprosy signifies false doctrine, of which the Good Master does cleanse us.

    Let us pray.
Almighty and everlasting God, grant us an increase of faith, hope, and charity, and that we may worthily obtain that which Thou dost promise, make us  love that which Thou command. Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

 

Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Matthew
Matthew 6:24-33


    At that time, Jesus said unto His disciples: "No man can serve two masters. For either he will hate the one, and love the other: or he will sustain the one, and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon.  Therefore I say to you, be not solicitous for your life, what you shall eat, nor for your body, what you shall put on. Is not the life more than the meat: and the body more than the raiment?  Behold the birds of the air, for they neither sow, nor do they reap, nor gather into barns: and your heavenly Father feeds them. Are not you of much more value than they?  And which of you by taking thought, can add to his stature one cubit?  And for clothing, why are you concerned? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they labor not, nor do they spin.  But I say to you, that not even Solomon in all his glory was arrayed as one of these.  And if the grass of the field, which is today, and tomorrow is cast into the oven, God doth so clothe: how much more you, O you of little faith?  Be not concerned therefore, saying, 'What shall we eat: or what shall we drink, or with what shall we be clothed?'  For after all these things the heathens seek. For your Father knows that you have need of all these things.  First seek the kingdom of God, and his justice, and all these things shall be added unto you."

An Homily of Saint Augustine, Bishop
Book ii. on the Lord's Sermon on the Mount, chapter xiv

    "No man can serve two masters," is to be referred to this very intent, as He goes on to explain, saying: "For either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will submit to the one, and despise the other."  And these words are to be carefully considered; for who the two masters are he immediately shows, when He says, You cannot serve God and mammon. "Riches" are said to be called mammon among the Hebrews. The Punic name also corresponds: for "gain" is called mammon in Punic.

Lesson viii

    But he who serves mammon certainly serves him who, as being set over those earthly things in virtue of his perversity, is called by our Lord the prince of this world. A man will therefore either hate this one, and love the other, i.e. God; or he will submit to the one, and despise the other. For whoever serves mammon submits to a hard and ruinous master: for, being entangled by his own lust, he becomes a subject of the devil, and he does not love him; for who is there who loves the devil? But yet he submits to him; as in any large house he who is connected with another man's maid servant submits to hard bondage on account of his passion. even though he does not love him whose maid-servant he loves.

Lesson ix

    "But he will despise the other," He has not said; "he will hate." For almost no one's conscience can hate God; but he despises, i.e. he does not fear Him, as if feeling himself secure in consideration of His goodness. From this carelessness and ruinous security the Holy Spirit recalls us, when He says by the prophet, "My son, do not add sin upon sin, and say, 'The mercy of God is great' (Ecclesiasticus 5: 5-6); and, "Do you not know that the patience of God invites you to repentance?" (Romans 2:4)  For whose mercy can be mentioned as being so great as His, who pardons all the sins of those who return, and makes the wild olive a partaker of the fatness of the olive? And whose severity as being so great as His, who spared not the natural branches, but broke them off because of unbelief? But let not any one who wishes to love God, and to beware of offending Him, suppose that he can serve two masters; and let him disentangle the upright intention of his heart from all duplicity: for thus he will think of the Lord with a good heart, and in simplicity of heart will seek Him.

Let us pray:
    Keep, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy Church with perpetual peace. And because the frailty of man without Thee cannot but fall, keep us ever by Thy help from all things hurtful, and lead us to all things profitable to our salvation.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke
Luke 7:11-16

    At that time: Jesus went into a city called Naim; and there went with Him His disciples, and a great multitude.  And when He came near the gate of the city, behold a dead man was carried out, the only son of his mother; and she was a widow: and a great multitude of the city was with her.  When the Lord had seen her, being moved with mercy towards her, He said to her: "Weep not."  And He came near and touched the bier. And they that carried it, stood still. And He said: "Young man, I say to thee, arise."  And he that was dead, sat up, and began to speak. And He gave him to his mother.  And there came a fear on them all: and they glorified God, saying: "A great prophet has risen up among us: and, God has visited his people.

An homily of Saint Augustine, Bishop
44th Discourse on the Words of the Lord.

    That her son was called again to life was the joy of that widowed mother; that souls of men are every day called to life is the joy of our Mother the Church. He was dead in body they have been dead in mind. His death was outward, and was outwardly bewailed; theirs inward. Death has been neither mourned nor seen. But He has sought for them, Who has seen that they are dead, and He only has seen that they are dead, Who is able to make them alive. If He had not come to raise the dead, the Apostle would not have said: "Awake, thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light" (Ephesians 5:14).

Lesson viii

    We find written that the Lord raised three persons from the dead visibly, but thousands invisibly. But how many He may of raised visibly, who knows?—for all the things which He did are not written. As John said: "There are also many other things which Jesus did, the which, if they should be written every one, I suppose that even the world itself could not contain the books that should be written" (John 21-25). There were then, doubtless, many more raised to life, but it is not meaningless that three are recorded. For our Lord Jesus Christ willed that those things which He did carnally, we should understand also spiritually. He did not work miracles only for the sake of working wonders, but that His works might be at once wonderful to them that beheld, and true to them that understand them.

Lesson ix

    Even as one that looks upon a scroll beautifully written, but doesn't know how to read, praises the hand of the old scribe when he sees the beauty of the points, but what it says, what those points mean, he knows not—he praises by the eye, without understanding by the mind, and as, on the other hand, he that can not only gaze on it, as can all men, but also can read it, praises the penmanship, and catches the sense as well, which the unlearned cannot do even so, there were some that saw the miracles which Christ did, and understood not what they meant, nor what they, as it were, hinted to such as did understand them, and these only marveled to see them wrought. And other some there were which saw the works, and marveled, and understood them, and profited by them. And it is as these last that we ought to be in the school of Christ.

Let us pray:
    Let Thy continual pity cleanse and defend Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord. And because it cannot continue in safety without Thee, govern it evermore by Thy help.   Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

 

Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke
Luke 14:1-11

     And it came to pass, when Jesus went into the house of one of the chief of the Pharisees, on the Sabbath day, to eat bread, that they watched Him.  And behold, there was a certain man before Him that had the dropsy.  And Jesus answering, spoke to the lawyers and Pharisees, saying: "Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath day?"  But they held their peace. But He taking him, healed him, and sent him away.  And answering them, He said: "Which of you shall have an ass or an ox fall into a pit, and will not immediately draw him out, on the Sabbath day?"  And they could not answer him to these things.  And he spoke a parable also to them that were invited, marking how they chose the first seats at the table, saying to them:  "When you are invited to a wedding, do not sit down in the first place, lest perhaps one more honorable than you has been invited by him:  And he that invited you and he, comes and says to you, 'Give this man place': and then you begin with shame to take the lowest place.  But when you are invited, go, sit down in the lowest place; that when he who invited you comes, he may say to you: 'Friend, go up higher.'   Then you shall have glory before those who sit at table with you.  Because every one that exalts himself shall be humbled; and he that humbles himself, shall be exalted.

 

An Homily of Saint Ambrose, Bishop.
Book vii. on Luke xiv.

    Now this man sick of the [hy]dropsy is healed, in whom too much watery matter had well-nigh drowned the functions of life, and quenched the fire of understanding.  Soon, a lesson is given in lowly-mindedness, when it is forbidden to the guests at a marriage feast to go and sit down unasked in the highest place, albeit the Lord spoke gently, that the teaching of courtesy might forestall a harsh rebuke, reason might prevail by dint of persuasion, and desires be bent to follow the instruction. And upon this, as next-door neighbor, comes courtesy, which is so called by the Lord, when it is shown to the poor and weak, since to show it to them from whom we are to receive anything at all is but a movement of self-interest.

Lesson viii

    Lastly, as to a soldier that has served his full time, is apportioned a reward for esteeming lightly of riches so he only can inherit the kingdom of God, whose soul is not given to seek after lower ends, and who doesn't purchase for himself earthly possessions, whereas the Lord said: "Sell what you have, and follow Me" (Matthew 19:21). Neither can he gain it who buys oxen, which beasts Elisha slew and gave unto the people. (cf. 3 Kings 19:21). Neither can he win it which hath married a wife and therefore cannot come, for "he that is unmarried cares for the things that belong to the Lord, how he may please the Lord but he that is married cares for the things that are of the world, how he may please his wife." (I Corinthians 7:32, 33). Not that this is to be taken for blame of marriage, but only that virginity is the more honorable way, since "the unmarried woman" and the widow "care for the things of the Lord, that they may be holy both in body and in spirit" (I Corinthians 7:34)

Lesson viii

    But in all fairness, having thus spoken concerning widows, let us consider the married, and join with them in entertaining the opinion which is held by so many, that there are only three classes of men who are shut out from the great supper named in the gospel, which three classes are Heathens, Jews, and Heretics. And therefore it is that the Apostle warns us that we "walk not as other Gentiles walk" (Ephesians 4:17),  in malice and bitterness, and uncleanness, and covetousness, and so have no entry into the kingdom of Christ, since "no unclean person, nor covetous man, who is an idolater, hath any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and of God" (Ephesians 5:5).

 

Let us pray:
    O Lord, we pray Thee that Thy grace may always precede and follow us, and make us continually intent upon all good works.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Matthew
Matthew 22:34-46

    At that time, the Pharisees came unto Jesus, and one of them, a doctor of the law, asking Him, tempting Him:  "Master, which is the greatest commandment in the law?"  Jesus said to him: "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with thy whole heart, and with thy whole soul, and with thy whole mind.  This is the greatest and the first commandment.  And the second is like to this: Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.  On these two commandments depend the whole law and the prophets."  And the Pharisees being gathered together, Jesus asked them,  Saying: "What think you of Christ? whose Son is he?"  They say to him: "David's."  He said to them: "How then does David in spirit call him Lord, saying: 'The Lord said to my Lord, Sit on my right hand, until I make thy enemies thy footstool?' If David then call him Lord, how is he his son?"  And no man was able to answer him a word; neither dared any man from that day forth ask him any more questions.

An Homily of Saint John Chrysostom, Patriarch
LXXII on Matthew

    When the Pharisees had heard that Christ had put the Sadducees to silence, they gathered themselves together for a fresh attack just when it behooved them to be quiet. They willed to contend, so they put forward one of themselves who professed skill in the law, not wishing to learn, but to lay a snare. This person therefore proposed the question: "Which is the great commandment in the law?” The first and great commandment is: "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God," but they expected that He would make some exception or addition to this in His Own case, since He made Himself God (cf. John 10:33). With this expectation they asked Him the question, but what said Christ? To show that they had adopted this course, because they were loveless, and sick with envy, He answered: "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like it: "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself."

Lesson viii

    Why is this second commandment like the first?  Because the first is the second's source and sanction. "For every one that does evil hates the light, neither comes to the light" (John 3:20). And again: "The fool said in his heart 'There is no God'" and there follows: "They are corrupt, and become abominable in their works" (Psalm 13:1).  And yet again: "The love of money is the root of all evil which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith" I Timothy 6:10). And yet once more: "If ye love Me, keep My commandments" (John 15:15), of which commandments the head and root are "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God and thy neighbor as thyself."

Lesson ix

    If therefore, to love God is to love our neighbor also, as it appeared, where it is written: "Simon, son of Jonas, do you love Me?"  And he said to Him: "Lord, You know all things, You know that I love You."  Jesus said to him: "Feed My sheep" (John 21:17), and if "love is the fulfilling of the law" (Romans 13:10), justly does the Lord say that "on these two commandments hang all the law and the Prophets." And even as when, before this, (Matthew 22:23-33), being interrogated about the Resurrection, He answered them more than they asked, so, now, being interrogated concerning the first and great commandment, He answered them, of His own accord, touching that second one also, which is little lower than the first, for "the second is like it." Here He would have them understand that it was hatred stirred them up to question Him.  For "Charity," says the Apostle, "envies not" (1 Corinthians 13:4).

Let us pray:
    Grant, O Lord, unto Thy people grace to withstand the temptations of the devil, and with pure minds to follow Thee, the only God.   Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Matthew
Matthew 9:1-8
 

    At that time: Jesus entering into a boat, passed over the water and came into His own city.  And behold they brought to Him one sick of the palsy lying in a bed. And Jesus, seeing their faith, said to the man sick of the palsy: "Be of good heart, son, thy sins are forgiven you."  And behold some of the scribes said within themselves: "He blasphemes."  And Jesus seeing their thoughts, said: "Why do you think evil in your hearts?  Which is easier, to say, "Your sins are forgiven you": or to say, "Arise, and walk?"  But that you may know that the Son of man has power on earth to forgive sins, (then said He to the man sick of palsy,) "Arise, take up your bed, and go into your house."  And he arose, and went into his house.  And the multitude seeing it, feared, and glorified God Who gave such power to men.

 

An Homily of Saint Peter Chrysologus, Bishop.
Sermon 50.

    This day's reading has shown us an instance of how Christ, in those things which He did as Man, worked deep works of God, and by things which were seen produced things which were not seen. The Evangelist said Jesus "entered into a ship, and passed over, and came into His Own city." Was not This He Who had once parted the waves hither and thither, and made the dry ground appear at the bottom of the sea, so that His people Israel passed dry-shod between masses of water standing still, as through an hollow glen in a mountain? Was not This He Who made the depths of the sea solid under the feet of Peter, so that the watery path offered a firm way for human footsteps?

Lesson viii

    He denied Himself a similar service from the sea, but crossed over that narrow lake at the cost of a voyage on shipboard: "He entered into a ship, and passed over." What wonder, brethren: Christ came to take our weakness upon Him, that He might make us partakers of His strength to seek the things of men, that He might give to men the things of God to receive insults, that He might bestow honors to bear weariness, that He might grant rest for the physician that is himself beset by no frailties, knows not how to treat the frailties of others, nor he that is not weak with the weak, how to make the weak strong.

Lesson ix

    Therefore, if Christ had aremained still in His strength, He would not in any way have been a fellow of menif in Him Flesh had not run the way of flesh, then had it been idle for Him to have taken Flesh at all. "He entered into a ship, and passed over, and came into His Own city." The Lord, the Maker of the world, and of all things that are therein, having been pleased for our sakes to imprison Himself in our flesh, began to have a human home, and to be a citizen of a Jewish cityHimself the Father of all, to have parents and all, that His love might invite, His charity draw, His tenderness bind, His gentleness persuade those whom His Kingship had scared, His awfulness scattered, and His power terrified out of His dominion.

Let us pray:
    In Thy tender mercy, direct our hearts, we beseech Thee, O Lord, because without Thee we are not able to please Thee.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Matthew
Matthew 22:1-14
 

    At that time, Jesus spoke by parables unto the chief priests and Pharisees, and said: "The kingdom of heaven is like unto a certain king, who made a marriage for his son.  And he sent his servants, to call them that were invited to the marriage; and they would not come.  Again he sent other servants, saying: 'Tell them that were invited, Behold, I have prepared my dinner; my calves and fatlings are killed, and all things are ready: come to the marriage.'  But they neglected, and went their own ways, one to his farm, and another to his merchandise.  And the rest laid hands on his servants, and having treated them shamefully, put them to death.  But when the king had heard of it, he was angry, and sending his armies, he destroyed those murderers, and burnt their city.  Then he said to his servants: 'The marriage indeed is ready; but they that were invited were not worthy.  Go therefore into the highways; and as many as you shall find, call to the marriage.'  And his servants going forth into the ways, gathered together all that they found, both bad and good: and the marriage was filled with guests.  And the king went in to see the guests: and he saw there a man not wearing on a wedding garment.  And he said to him: 'Friend, how did you come in here not having a wedding garment?'  But he was silent. Then the king said to the waiters: 'Bind his hands and feet, and cast him into the exterior darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.'  For many are called, but few are chosen. "

 

An Homily of Pope Saint Gregory the Great
38th on the Gospels

    I remember that I have often said that, in the Holy Gospel, the Church as she now is, is called the kingdom of heaven, for the kingdom of heaven is indeed the assembly of the righteous. The Lord said by the mouth of His Prophet: "Heaven is My throne..." (Isaias 66:1). Solomon said: "The throne of wisdom is the soul of the righteous" (Attributed by Saint Augustine). And Paul said that Christ is the power of God and the wisdom of God" (1 Corinthians 1:24). From these passages we may clearly gather that if wisdom be God, and wisdom's throne be the soul of the righteous, and God's throne be the heaven, then the soul of the righteous is heaven. Hence also the Psalmist said, speaking of holy preachers: "The heavens declare the glory of God" (Psalm 18:2).

Lesson viii

    The kingdom of heaven, therefore, is the Church of the righteous, even of them whose hearts seek not for anything upon earth, but who sigh so continually after the things which are above, that God already reigns in them as He does in heaven. Let it then be said, "The kingdom of heaven is like unto a certain king, which made a marriage for his son." You already understand, my loving friends, who is that Royal Father of a Royal Son. It is indeed no other than He to Whom the Psalmist said: "Give the King thy judgments, O God, and thy righteousness unto the King's son" (Psalm 71:2). Which made a marriage for his son. God the Father made a marriage for God the Son, when He wedded Him to the manhood in the womb of the Virgin, when He willed that He Who is God before all ages, should in the end of the ages become Man.

Lesson ix

    The marriage union is the union of two persons, but God forbid that we should imagine that the One Person of our Redeemer Jesus Christ, Who is both God and Man, is formed by a union of an human person with a Divine Person. We profess concerning Him that He is of, and in two natures, but we shrink from the blasphemy of saying that He is compounded of two persons. It will therefore be clearer and safer to say that the marriage which the Father made for His Royal Son was the wedding Him, through the mystery of the Incarnation, to His mystic Bride the Holy Church. The womb of the Maiden Mother was the marriage chamber in which this union took place. Hence it is that the Psalmist said: "In the sun hath He set His tabernacle, Who is as a bridegroom coming out of his chamber" (Psalm 18:6).

Let us pray:
    O almighty and merciful God, in Thy goodness keep us, we beseech Thee, from all things hurtful; that we, being ready both in body and soul may accomplish those things which belong to Thy service.   Through our Lord Jesus Christ.
 

Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to John
John 4:46-53


    At that time, there was a certain ruler whose son was sick at Cepharnaum. He, having heard that Jesus was come from Judea into Galilee, went to Him, and prayed Him to come down, and heal his son; for he was at the point of death. Jesus therefore said to him, "Unless you see signs and wonders, you believe not." The ruler said to Him, "Lord, come down before my son dies." Jesus said to him, "Go your way, your son lives." The man believed the word that Jesus said to him, and went his way. And as he was going down, his servants met him, and they brought word, saying that his son lived. He asked them, therefore, the hour in which he grew better. And they said to him, "Yesterday at the seventh hour, the fever left him." The father, therefore, knew that it was at the same hour that Jesus said to him, "Your son lives." And he himself believed, and his whole household.

An Homily of Pope Saint Gregory the Great
XXVIII on the Gospels.

    My brethren, the passage from the Holy Gospel, which you have just now heard, stands in no need of explanation. But rather than passing the time in idle silence, I will say something about itbut that rather by way of exhortation than of explanation. Indeed, there seems to me to be only one point which calls for explanation, and that point is this: Why was it that when the nobleman went unto the Lord, and besought Him that He should come down and heal his son, Jesus said unto him: “Except ye see signs and wonders, you will not believe”? The very fact that he had come to beseech Christ to heal his son, puts it beyond all doubt that this nobleman believedif he had not believed Him to be a Savior, he would not have asked Him to save his son. Why then did Jesus say to him: "Except you see signs and wonders, you will not believe," since he was one who had not seen, and yet had believed?

Lesson viii

    But think about his prayer, and you shall understand clearly how his faith was shaky. He "besought Him that He should come down and heal his son." He asked for the bodily presence of Him Who is always spiritually present everywhere. He believed not enough in Christ, for he thought that He could not heal unless He were bodily present. Had his faith been perfect, he would doubtless have known that God is everywhere.

Lesson ix

    This was therefore a grievously imperfect faith, in attributing the virtue not to Christ's Majesty, but to His bodily presence. Thus it was that his faith was still unsound, even while he was asking for his son's health. For, though he believed concerning Him unto Whom he came that He was mighty to save, yet he thought also that at that moment He was absent from his dying child. But the Lord, being asked to go, showed that, wherever He is called on, He is there, and being He Who, by a simple act of will, brought all things into being, gave health by a simple command.

Let us pray:
    Grant unto Thy faithful people pardon and peace, we beseech Thee, merciful Lord, that they may be both cleansed from all their sins and serve Thee with a quiet mind.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.
 

Twenty-First Sunday after Pentecost

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Matthew
Matthew 18:23-35

    At that time, Jesus spoke unto His disciples this parable: The kingdom of heaven is likened unto a certain king, who would take account of his servants.  And when he had begun to take the account, one was brought to him, that owed him ten thousand talents. And as he had not wherewith to pay it, his lord commanded that he should be sold, and his wife and children and all that he had, and payment to be made.  But that servant falling down, besought him, saying: "Have patience with me, and I will pay you all of it."  And the lord of that servant being moved with pity, let him go and forgave him the debt.  But when that servant was gone out, he found one of his fellow servants that owed him an hundred denarii: and laying hold of him, throttled him, saying: "Pay what you owe!"  And his fellow servant falling down, besought him, saying: "Have patience with me, and I will pay you all I owe." And he would not: but went and cast him into prison, till he paid the debt. Now his fellow servants seeing what was done, were very much grieved, and they came and told their lord all that had been done.  Then his lord called him; and said to him: "You wicked servant, I forgave you all the debt, because you besought me:  Shouldn't you then have had compassion also on your fellow servant, even as I had compassion on you?  And his lord being angry, delivered him to the torturers until he paid all the debt.  So also shall my heavenly Father do to you, if you forgive not every one his brother from your hearts.

 

An Homily of Saint Jerome, Priest
Book iii. Commentary on Matthew xviii

    It is very common with the Syrians, and especially with the inhabitants of Palestine, to illustrate their discourse with parables, that what their listeners may not be able to catch so easily when spoken plainly, they may lay hold on by dint of comparisons and examples. Thus it was that the Lord, by an allegory about a Royal master and a servant who owed him ten thousand talents, and who obtained by entreaty forgiveness of the debt, taught Peter how it was his duty to forgive his fellow-servants their comparatively trifling offences. For if that Royal master so readily forgave his servant his debt of ten thousand talents, should not his servants much more forgive lesser debts unto their fellows?

Lesson xiii

    Let put this more clearly, let us take a case. If one of us were to commit adultery, or murder, or sacrilege, our sin, great like a debt of ten thousand talents, would be forgiven us in answer to prayer, if we also from our heart forgive our brethren their trespasses against us. But if we refuse to forgive a slight, and keep up unceasing enmity because of an unkind word, how just does it appear that we should be cast into prison, and entail on ourselves, by the example of our own deeds, that our great debt should not be forgiven unto us.

    "So likewise shall My heavenly Father do to you, if  from your hearts you don't forgive every brother his trespasses." God's awful purpose can be turned and changed but if we will not forgive our brethren small things, God will not forgive us great things. And if we forgive them, it must be from our hearts. Any one can say: "I have nothing against a certain onehe knows what he has done, and God will judge him for it I do not care what he didI have forgiven him." But the Lord makes His sentence clear, and destroys such a mockery of peace as this, where He said: "So likewise shall My heavenly Father do also unto you, if ye from your hearts forgive not every one his brother their trespasses."

Let us pray:
    Lord, we pray Thee, keep Thy household the Church in continual goodness; that through Thy protection it may be free from all adversities, and devoutly given to good works, to the glory of Thine holy name.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.
 

Twenty-Second Sunday after Pentecost

Let us pray:
    O God, who art our refuge and strength, who art the author of all godliness; hear, we pray Thee, the devout prayers of Thy Church, and grant that what we ask confidently we may obtain effectually.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.
 

 

Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost

Let us pray:
    Absolve, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the sins of Thy people; that we may be delivered by Thy goodness, from the bonds of sin which by our frailty we have committed.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.
 

 

There may be as many as Twenty-Eight Sundays after Pentecost
please see the rubric at
..\english\pentend.html to see how the number is determined,
and from where the texts are to be taken.

Third Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Let us pray:
    Almighty and eternal God, mercifully look upon our infirmity, and stretch forth the right hand of Thy majesty to help and defend us.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.


Fourth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Let us pray:
    O God, who know us to be set in the midst of dangers so great that, by reason of the frailty of our nature we cannot always withstand; grant us health of mind and body, that being helped by Thee, we may overcome the things which we suffer for our sins.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.
 

Fifth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Let us pray:
    In Thine infinite goodness, we beseech Thee, O Lord, to watch over Thy household, that even as it relies solely upon the hope of Thy heavenly grace, so it may ever be defended by Thy protection.   Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

 

Sixth Sunday of Epiphany celebrated after Pentecost

Let us pray:
    Grant, we beseech Thee, almighty God, that ever meditating upon the truths Thou hast proposed for our intelligence, we may in every word and work of ours, do that which is pleasing to Thee.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.
 

Twenty-Fourth and Last Sunday after Pentecost

Let us pray:
    Stir up the wills of Thy faithful, we beseech Thee, O Lord; that they, more earnestly seeking the fruit of good works, may receive more abundantly the gifts of Thy loving kindness.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ.
 

 

Lesson vii

The continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Matthew
Matthew 4:1-11

 


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